Parade

Parade

"The artistic elements of the show are some of the best that have graced the stage at the Merry - Go - Round Playhouse. The set by Czerton Lim evokes power and intensity before the show even begins. The audience sees chairs hanging from the rafters, which are constantly carried in and out by the performers. The lighting by Jose Santiago adds another layer of intensity to the thought-provoking production, while the costumes by Tiffany Howard and wig designs by Al Annotto help bring the complex characters to life within a specific historical era. This production of Parade is brilliantly done. Although it's a large-scale production, the staging is still very intimate, which makes it all the more absorbing. It is truly special."

Natasha Ashley - NY Theatre Guide
 

"It’s a powerhouse production, creatively staged: many of the show’s 31 characters (perfectly costumed by Tiffany Howard) are onstage simultaneously. Czerton Lim’s three-tiered wood and metal set is grim and foreboding, opening with eight straight-backed chairs and one table suspended over the bare boards like strange fruit. Jose Santiago lights the action emotionally, murkily, in yellow and red tones, shaping haunting effects on the backdrop outline of an enormous, thick-branched tree."

Barbara Adams - Ithaca Times
 

"Visual highlights include Czerton Lim's very workable, multi-level set design that begins and ends the piece with several props suspended in a visual tableau creatively denoting the parameters of the action, while Tiffany Howard's period costume design puts us solidly into the beginning of the 20th century."

Tony Curulla - The Post Standard
 

"Show director and festival Producing Artistic Director Brett Smock brilliantly arranges his ensemble about designer Czerton Lim's stage, a spiderweb of stairs and platforms with Leo often occupying its vulnerable middle."

David Wilcox - The Citizen


Crazy For You

Crazy For You

"We switch between 1930s New York City—where Bobby Childs, yearning to dance, tries to avoid the family banking business—and Deadrock, Nevada, where Polly Baker, postmistress, is the only woman in a dying town. Completed by Dan Ozminkowski’s lighting, Czerton Lim’s crafty, cartoonish backdrops set the stage perfectly. Out West, there’s another comic wink, where the facing buildings—the former theater turned post office and the local saloon—actually spell out “Dead” “Rock.”

Barbara Adams - Ithaca Times


"The set design by Czerton Lim captures the contrast between Bobby Child’s life in New York City and the life in Nevada in perfect detail, including a car that moves across the stage. The costumes by Tiffany Howard flow beautifully in every dance number, enhancing the emotion of the music as well as the performances.  All of the artistic elements come together to create a beautiful and captivating story."

Natasha Ashley - NY Theatre Guide

Nominated for the 2016 Syracuse Area Live Theater (SALT) Awards for Best Set Design of a Musical


Sweeney Todd

Sweeney Todd

"Director Igor Goldin has marshaled (and handsomely staged) enormous talent here, starting with the design. Czerton Lim’s striking two-level set is an abandoned pie tin factory, all concrete and metal, disturbingly dingy. Not a detail is missing, from high filthy windows and overhead ductwork to grim oven below—straight from your worst nightmare.

Lim’s versatile set—effectively lit by Ben Hagen—serves as Todd’s and Lovett’s shops, the judge’s home, his court, an insane asylum, and the streets of London—all equally sinister, which is the point. Goldin has “updated” the tale to post-World War II, the most significant effect being Tiffany Howard’s costuming, which puts the street and factory women in grey tailored suit-dresses, suggesting automatons. With such a rich set, the tale has only to unfold."

Barbara Adams - Ithaca Times


"(Igor) Goldin updates the setting to post-World War II London, with members of the chorus punching a time clock as they enter Czerton Lim‘s industrial-looking, multi-level unit set. (In a lovely touch, Todd’s murdered victims punch out as they walk off the set.)"

Barbara Haas - Syracuse New Times


West Side Story

West Side Story

"Scenic designer Czerton Lim's sets yield fold after gritty fold of 1950s New York City, and Esse cleverly stages the rumble at the climax of act one behind steel caging to isolate its primal participants from the audience — and to blur the daylight between their punches and their recipients' faces, no doubt."

David Wilcox - The Citizen
 

"No one here is trying to reinvent the wheel, save for Czerton Lim’s atmospheric and versatile settings. This production has gone back to 1957 to remind us why West Side Story is still great and why it still matters...Lim’s set angles buildings like German expressionism so that the walls are pressing down on these kids. The buildings also fold out and extend in smart ways that are fun to watch as they change onstage. Best of all is the stage backing, a low angle vision of a Brooklyn brownstone, a vision that’s more Martin Scorsese or Spike Lee than the 1950s."

Bryan VanCampen - Ithaca Times


The Diary of Anne Frank

The Diary of Anne Frank

"Czerton Lim’s scenic design is also just as much a character in this show and one that helps to capture the overall theme. It is a four-level set, framed in by wall corners. There are stairs in different spots throughout and it faithfully reproduces the cramped feel of so many people living in such a small space for more than two years. "

Bridgette Redman - Encore Michigan

Nominated for the 2015 Wilde Awards for Best Design - Sets


On the Town

On the Town

"There’s a charming innocence to three gobs seeking adventure and romance in this magical town—and Czerton Lim’s stunning set, brilliantly lit by Dan Ozminkowski, captures it all. A weathered American flag becomes the framework for the set pieces: huge letters spelling out New York in an old postcard font, with a Manhattan skyline silhouetted beyond. The set is, in fact, a 1940s postcard come to life, as video projections (by Brad Peterson) on the letters swiftly take us from one locale to another—the Brooklyn Navy Yard, Coney Island, a string of nightclubs. The effect is lively and dazzling, and adds emotional tones—the endless loneliness of the subway tunnels; warplanes in formation soaring in a pale sky."

Barbara Adams - Ithaca Times
 

"The artistic staff makes this production seem like you are really traveling through New York City with the high-energy cast. Czerton Lim’s scenic design of cut out letters, spelling New York in the background, works out amazingly, along with Brad Peterson’s projections of the subway system, advertisements, water, and ship yard. There is one moving piece of set, “city,” that serves as a taxi-cab, couch, seats on the subway, piano, etc. This transforms many of the scenes with ease and professionalism. Bravo to the creative artistic team, the end result was breathtaking."

Natasha Ashley - NY Theatre Guide


Gentlemen Prefer Blondes

Gentlemen Prefer Blondes

“Czerton Lim’s dazzling sets, all within a series of swirling Art Deco frames and magically lit by Adam Frank, are some of the most stunning seen here in years.  The cruise ship Ile de France, both dockside and deckside; luxurious staterooms and ballrooms; the streets of Paris and the Eiffel Tower itself - simply breathtaking.”

Barbara Adams - Ithaca Times


“Scenic designer Czerton Lim enhances Blondes’ world of high times and swanky swells, where staterooms are the size of Fifth Avenue luxury suites, all the better for porthole peeking and inevitable misunderstandings.”

Bill DeLapp - Syracuse New Times


“Happily, like the movie, the Merry-Go-Round’s production of “Gentlemen Prefer Blondes” consistently rises the material. Overall, production values are lush, with lavish period costumes by Garth Dunbar. Perhaps the most impressive element is the sleek scenic design by Czerton Lim, featuring a set of art deco arches framing the action.  The sparkling shipboard scenes look like the jaunty covers of 1920’s magazines, and a view from under the Eiffel Tower is spectacular.”

Len Fonte - The Post Standar


Singin' in the Rain

Singin' in the Rain

“Scenic designer Czerton Lim has come up with an elegant modular set that is able to encompass several Tinseltown locations, particularly a very effective and fun version of Graumann’s Chinese Theatre, a lovely park setting, and various soundstages.”

Bryan VanCampen - Ithaca Times


“This production at MGR Playhouse is handsomely mounted, pleasing to the eye as well as the ear.  Czerton Lim’s set designs capture the feeling of Hollywood slickness, glitz and glamor whether the setting is Graumann’s Chinese Theatre, a studio boss’ mansion or a sound stage.”

Neil Novelli - The Post Standard


Medea

Medea

“Theater Mitu's production of Medea is stunning visually. The set, lighting, and costume design are wonderful examples of what can be done in a small space with imagination and vision. All the physical elements of this production are highly sculptural and appealing.”

Jane Titus – nytheatre.com


Man of La Mancha

Man of La Mancha

“Even though the action takes place in a dungeon and the cast members, including the title character, are supposed to be outcasts, La Mancha has the lushest-looking set MGR has had all summer…There are forbidding stone walls, menacing shackles, gleaming soldiers’ helmets, fetid beggars and gypsies, and the drawbridge to hell, or at least the Spanish Inquisition.”

James MacKillop – Syracuse New Times


A Number

A Number

“The production has an elaborate set, designed by Czerton Lim, suggesting an aspirational suburban interior albeit one where the wallpaper resembles microscope slides of DNA.”

Juliet Hindell – Exuent Magazine


“Czerton Lim’s set includes wall panels that initially resemble abstract patterns, but reveal themselves to be DNA sequences. It’s a subtle underscoring of the play’s themes, and it's effective.”

Mark Sullivan – Capital NY